What is Narcotics Anonymous?5 min read

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By Vincent – Chair of ASFA

Narcotics Anonymous is growing well in Cardiff, with approx 5 meetings a week. These meetings are all well attended and growing in numbers.

Below is a list of when and where all Cardiff N.A meetings take place:

Venue
Quaker Meeting House
43 Charles Street
Cardiff
South Glamorgan
Wales
CF10 2GB
https://ukna.org/meetings/county/south-glamorgan

Monday evenings              @ 8pm – 9pm                Open to all on request

Wednesday evenings        @ 8pm – 9pm                Open to all on request

Thursday mornings           @ 10am – 11am             Addicts only

Friday evenings                  @ 8pm – 9pm                Open to all on request

Sunday evenings                @ 7pm – 8pm                Open to all on request

When you arrive, just ring the buzzer and someone will let you in. Everyone will arrive 20mins before for a cuppa and a chat. Most meetings are open to all to come along and find out about addiction and the 12 step programme.

At community rehab meetings, everyone will sit around in a circle and take turns to share their personal experiences with each other.

The group will listen to the similarities and not the differences. N.A is run by people who have recovered from all different types of substance misuse (like prescription drugs, cannabis, cocaine, crack, heroin, alcohol, spice, ecstasy, speed and ketamine), they don’t tend to talk about the drug, but more about how the addiction has affected them, so no matter what, you can connect with stories and relate to how addiction has affected other people.

If you find it difficult to talk in front of a group, you can always talk to someone before or after the meeting. There is no pressure to talk at the meeting at all, if you don’t want to.

Vincent says..
It’s a very relaxed atmosphere and is a safe place to talk with people who share the same common problems, who are non-judgemental and have a good understanding of how substance misuse affects the family and the people closest to us. It’s a completely voluntary organisation led by peers who have recovered from active addictions, which are not judgemental and have your best interests at heart. The only rule is “who you see in N.A, what you hear in N.A, stays in N.A, when you leave N.A.” If you see fellow people outside of the meeting, we respect their right to remain anonymous, so we do not approach them or acknowledge them unless they’ve agreed it’s ok to do so. It’s important to remember that some people may be seriously affected if anyone outside of the meetings found out they had a substance misuse problem. N.A place principles before personalities. Gossip can be very damaging to recovery, which would possibly lead to relapse or worse.

N.A is not connected to any other organisation such as police, social services, DVLA, mental health or DWP. This is how N.A operates freely and is able to put people’s recovery first by creating a safe place to talk for everyone.

You are welcome to come along, even if you want to find out how N.A will be able to help you. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

It took me a while to realise that just because I still had people in my life, had a place to stay and was fully functioning that I had an addiction problem. I thought I was in control of my use of alcohol and substances because I was not a daily user, but the truth was if I am controlling something, it was already out of control. I had no idea that there were people all around me, in work and in everyday life who had addiction problems and still functioned as normal. I realised it’s not how much we use that makes it a problem, but what it does to us when we are not using that makes it a problem.

When I first came into N.A, I was told that if I follow what’s suggested, within one year I will say that I cannot possibly feel any better than how I feel today, and within 3 years, I will say that my life cannot possibly get any better than what it is today. I didn’t believe them until I experienced it for myself and trust me they were telling the truth.

N.A doesn’t just offer freedom from addiction, it offers a new life. I’ve seen people in recovery, with depression and a feeling of hopelessness. Within 1 year they built a brand new life through working the 12 step program far greater than they could have ever imagined. Miracles do happen in recovery on a daily basis.

N.A helps support us to recover and helps us get through difficult situations in our daily lives. It’s like a second family to me, where I found real friends who care and genuinely want to help me recover. There’s no ulterior motives from people who phone me and help me in my recovery other than to see me get well. It’s part of their recovery to help others in recovery.

Still not sure?
If you’re still not sure about attending N.A meetings, have a think about these questions:

Are you wishing away the week days until you can use again?
Do you feel you cannot have a good time on nights out unless you get drunk or high?
Do you feel restless, irritable and discontent when not using?
Is drinking or misusing substances having an impact on your relationships with the people closest to you?
Is it having an impact on your finances?
Is it making you feel down and depressed while not misusing substances or alcohol?

If you answered yes to any of them, please think about finding out more info on N.A, and feel free to go along to any of the meetings. N.A offers people freedom from active addiction to any form of mood changing or mind altering chemicals and this includes alcohol. N.A offers a bridge to normal living to a life beyond your wildest dreams. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

If you have any queries or are unsure about anything, please contact N.A free helpline 0300 999 1212 or visit their website: https://ukna.org/

1 Comment

  1. Paul O'Leary

    great pitch and questions and description
    be great to have the same for Recovery Cymru
    and for Alcoholics Anonymous

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